g Band plays a key role in the encoding of visual features in the primary visual cortex (V1). In rodents V1 two ranges within the g band are sensitive to contrast: a broad g band (BB) increasing with contrast, and a narrow g band (NB), peaking at;60 Hz, decreasing with contrast. The functional roles of the two bands and the neural circuits originating them are not completely clear yet. Here, we show, combining experimental and simu-lated data, that in mice V1 (1) BB carries information about high contrast and NB about low contrast; (2) BB modulation depends on excitatory-inhibitory interplay in the cortex, while NB modulation is because of entrain-ment to the thalamic drive. In awake mice presented with alternating gratings, NB power progressively de-creased from low to intermediate levels of contrast where it reached a plateau. Conversely, BB power was constant across low levels of contrast, but it progressively increased from intermediate to high levels of con-trast. Furthermore, BB response was stronger immediately after contrast reversal, while the opposite held for NB. These complementary modulations were reproduced by a recurrent excitatory-inhibitory leaky integrate-and-fire network provided that the thalamic inputs were composed of a sustained and a periodic component having complementary sensitivity ranges. These results show that in rodents the thalamic-driven NB plays a specific key role in encoding visual contrast. Moreover, we propose a simple and effective network model of response to visual stimuli in rodents that might help in investigating network dysfunctions of pathologic visual information processing.

Narrow and broad g bands process complementary visual information in mouse primary visual cortex

Meneghetti N.;Mazzoni A.
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

g Band plays a key role in the encoding of visual features in the primary visual cortex (V1). In rodents V1 two ranges within the g band are sensitive to contrast: a broad g band (BB) increasing with contrast, and a narrow g band (NB), peaking at;60 Hz, decreasing with contrast. The functional roles of the two bands and the neural circuits originating them are not completely clear yet. Here, we show, combining experimental and simu-lated data, that in mice V1 (1) BB carries information about high contrast and NB about low contrast; (2) BB modulation depends on excitatory-inhibitory interplay in the cortex, while NB modulation is because of entrain-ment to the thalamic drive. In awake mice presented with alternating gratings, NB power progressively de-creased from low to intermediate levels of contrast where it reached a plateau. Conversely, BB power was constant across low levels of contrast, but it progressively increased from intermediate to high levels of con-trast. Furthermore, BB response was stronger immediately after contrast reversal, while the opposite held for NB. These complementary modulations were reproduced by a recurrent excitatory-inhibitory leaky integrate-and-fire network provided that the thalamic inputs were composed of a sustained and a periodic component having complementary sensitivity ranges. These results show that in rodents the thalamic-driven NB plays a specific key role in encoding visual contrast. Moreover, we propose a simple and effective network model of response to visual stimuli in rodents that might help in investigating network dysfunctions of pathologic visual information processing.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11382/540541
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