Plants seem to take up exogenous RNA that was artificially designed to target specific genes, followed by activation of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery. It is, however, not known whether plants use RNAs themselves as signalling molecules in plant-to-plant communication, other than evidence that an exchange of small RNAs occurs between parasitic plants and their hosts. Exogenous RNAs from the environment, if taken up by some living organisms, can indeed induce RNAi. This phenomenon has been observed in nematodes and insects, and host Arabidopsis cells secrete exosome-like extracellular vesicles to deliver plant small RNAs into Botrytis cinerea. Here we show that micro-RNAs (miRNAs) produced by plants act as signalling molecules affecting gene expression in other, nearby plants. Exogenous miRNAs, such as miR156 and miR399, trigger RNAi via a mechanism requiring both AGO1 and RDR6. This emphasizes that the production of secondary small interfering RNAs is required. This evidence highlights the existence of a mechanism in which miRNAs represent signalling molecules that enable communication between plants.

Exogenous miRNAs induce post-transcriptional gene silencing in plants

Betti F.;Ladera-Carmona M. J.;Weits D. A.;Ferri G.;Iacopino S.;Novi G.;Svezia B.;Kunkowska A. B.;Santaniello A.;Loreti E.
;
Perata P.
2021

Abstract

Plants seem to take up exogenous RNA that was artificially designed to target specific genes, followed by activation of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery. It is, however, not known whether plants use RNAs themselves as signalling molecules in plant-to-plant communication, other than evidence that an exchange of small RNAs occurs between parasitic plants and their hosts. Exogenous RNAs from the environment, if taken up by some living organisms, can indeed induce RNAi. This phenomenon has been observed in nematodes and insects, and host Arabidopsis cells secrete exosome-like extracellular vesicles to deliver plant small RNAs into Botrytis cinerea. Here we show that micro-RNAs (miRNAs) produced by plants act as signalling molecules affecting gene expression in other, nearby plants. Exogenous miRNAs, such as miR156 and miR399, trigger RNAi via a mechanism requiring both AGO1 and RDR6. This emphasizes that the production of secondary small interfering RNAs is required. This evidence highlights the existence of a mechanism in which miRNAs represent signalling molecules that enable communication between plants.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11382/543850
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