Purpose: The goals of this study were to (a) classify speech movements of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in presymptomatic and symptomatic phases of bulbar function decline relying solely on kinematic features of lips and jaw and (b) identify the most important measures that detect the transition between early and late bulbar changes. Method: One hundred ninety-two recordings obtained from 64 patients with ALS were considered for the analysis. Feature selection and classification algorithms were used to analyze lip and jaw movements recorded with Optotrak Certus (Northern Digital Inc.) during a sentence task. A feature set, which included 35 measures of movement range, velocity, acceleration, jerk, and area measures of lips and jaw, was used to classify sessions according to the speaking rate into presymptomatic (> 160 words per minute) and symptomatic (< 160 words per minute) groups. Results: Presymptomatic and symptomatic phases of bulbar decline were distinguished with high accuracy (87%), relying only on lip and jaw movements. The best features that allowed detecting the differences between early and later bulbar stages included cumulative path of lower lip and jaw, peak values of velocity, acceleration, and jerk of lower lip and jaw. Conclusion: The results established a relationship between facial kinematics and bulbar function decline in ALS. Considering that facial movements can be recorded by means of novel inexpensive and easy-to-use, video-based methods, this work supports the development of an automatic system for facial movement analysis to help clinicians in tracking the disease progression in ALS.

Kinematic Features of Jaw and Lips Distinguish Symptomatic From Presymptomatic Stages of Bulbar Decline in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Bandini, Andrea;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: The goals of this study were to (a) classify speech movements of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in presymptomatic and symptomatic phases of bulbar function decline relying solely on kinematic features of lips and jaw and (b) identify the most important measures that detect the transition between early and late bulbar changes. Method: One hundred ninety-two recordings obtained from 64 patients with ALS were considered for the analysis. Feature selection and classification algorithms were used to analyze lip and jaw movements recorded with Optotrak Certus (Northern Digital Inc.) during a sentence task. A feature set, which included 35 measures of movement range, velocity, acceleration, jerk, and area measures of lips and jaw, was used to classify sessions according to the speaking rate into presymptomatic (> 160 words per minute) and symptomatic (< 160 words per minute) groups. Results: Presymptomatic and symptomatic phases of bulbar decline were distinguished with high accuracy (87%), relying only on lip and jaw movements. The best features that allowed detecting the differences between early and later bulbar stages included cumulative path of lower lip and jaw, peak values of velocity, acceleration, and jerk of lower lip and jaw. Conclusion: The results established a relationship between facial kinematics and bulbar function decline in ALS. Considering that facial movements can be recorded by means of novel inexpensive and easy-to-use, video-based methods, this work supports the development of an automatic system for facial movement analysis to help clinicians in tracking the disease progression in ALS.
2018
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11382/552701
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