Background: The global public health crisis of antibiotic resistance is being driven in part by over prescription of antibiotics. We aimed to assess the relative weight of patient expectations, clinical uncertainty, and past behaviour on hospital-based physicians' antibiotic prescribing decisions. Methods: A discrete choice experiment was administered among hospital-based physicians in Tuscany, Italy. Respondents were asked to choose in which of two clinical scenarios they would be more likely to prescribe antibiotics, with the two cases differing in levels of clinical uncertainty, patient expectations, and the physician's past behaviour. We fitted a conditional logistic regression. Results: Respondents included 1,436 hospital-based physicians. Results show that the odds of prescribing antibiotics decrease when a patient requests it (OR=0.80, 95%CI [0.72,0.89]) and increase when the physician has prescribed antibiotics to a patient under similar circumstances previously (OR=1.15, 95%CI [1.03,1.27]). We found no significant effect of clinical uncertainty on the odds of prescribing antibiotics (OR=0.96, 95%CI [0.87, 1.07]). Conclusions: We show that patient expectation has a significant negative association with antibiotic prescribing among hospital-based physicians. Our findings speak to the importance of cultural context in shaping the physician's disposition when confronted with patient expectations. We suggest shared decision-making to improve prudent prescribing without compromising on patient satisfaction.

Patient expectations do matter - Experimental evidence on antibiotic prescribing decisions among hospital-based physicians

Cantarelli, Paola;Belle, Nicola
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: The global public health crisis of antibiotic resistance is being driven in part by over prescription of antibiotics. We aimed to assess the relative weight of patient expectations, clinical uncertainty, and past behaviour on hospital-based physicians' antibiotic prescribing decisions. Methods: A discrete choice experiment was administered among hospital-based physicians in Tuscany, Italy. Respondents were asked to choose in which of two clinical scenarios they would be more likely to prescribe antibiotics, with the two cases differing in levels of clinical uncertainty, patient expectations, and the physician's past behaviour. We fitted a conditional logistic regression. Results: Respondents included 1,436 hospital-based physicians. Results show that the odds of prescribing antibiotics decrease when a patient requests it (OR=0.80, 95%CI [0.72,0.89]) and increase when the physician has prescribed antibiotics to a patient under similar circumstances previously (OR=1.15, 95%CI [1.03,1.27]). We found no significant effect of clinical uncertainty on the odds of prescribing antibiotics (OR=0.96, 95%CI [0.87, 1.07]). Conclusions: We show that patient expectation has a significant negative association with antibiotic prescribing among hospital-based physicians. Our findings speak to the importance of cultural context in shaping the physician's disposition when confronted with patient expectations. We suggest shared decision-making to improve prudent prescribing without compromising on patient satisfaction.
2023
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11382/553252
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