The intention-detection strategy used to drive an exosuit is fundamental to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of the device. Yet, current literature on wearable soft robotics lacks evidence on the comparative performance of different control approaches for online intention-detection. In the present work, we compare two different and complementary controllers on a wearable robotic suit, previously formulated and tested by our group; a model-based myoelectric control (myoprocessor), which estimates the joint torque from the activation of target muscles, and a force control that estimates human torques using an inverse dynamics model (dynamic arm). We test them on a cohort of healthy participants performing tasks replicating functional activities of daily living involving a wide range of dynamic movements. Our results suggest that both controllers are robust and effective in detecting human–motor interaction, and show comparable performance for augmenting muscular activity. In particular, the biceps brachii activity was reduced by up to 74% under the assistance of the dynamic arm and up to 47% under the myoprocessor, compared to a no-suit condition. However, the myoprocessor outperformed the dynamic arm in promptness and assistance during movements that involve high dynamics. The exosuit work normalized with respect to the overall work was $68.84 pm 3.81%$ when it was ran by the myoprocessor, compared to $45.29 pm 7.71%$ during the dynamic arm condition. The reliability and accuracy of motor intention detection strategies in wearable device is paramount for both the efficacy and acceptability of this technology. In this article, we offer a detailed analysis of the two most widely used control approaches, trying to highlight their intrinsic structural differences and to discuss their different and complementary performance.

Myoelectric or Force Control? A Comparative Study on a Soft Arm Exosuit

Chiaradia D.;Frisoli A.;Riener R.;
2022

Abstract

The intention-detection strategy used to drive an exosuit is fundamental to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptability of the device. Yet, current literature on wearable soft robotics lacks evidence on the comparative performance of different control approaches for online intention-detection. In the present work, we compare two different and complementary controllers on a wearable robotic suit, previously formulated and tested by our group; a model-based myoelectric control (myoprocessor), which estimates the joint torque from the activation of target muscles, and a force control that estimates human torques using an inverse dynamics model (dynamic arm). We test them on a cohort of healthy participants performing tasks replicating functional activities of daily living involving a wide range of dynamic movements. Our results suggest that both controllers are robust and effective in detecting human–motor interaction, and show comparable performance for augmenting muscular activity. In particular, the biceps brachii activity was reduced by up to 74% under the assistance of the dynamic arm and up to 47% under the myoprocessor, compared to a no-suit condition. However, the myoprocessor outperformed the dynamic arm in promptness and assistance during movements that involve high dynamics. The exosuit work normalized with respect to the overall work was $68.84 pm 3.81%$ when it was ran by the myoprocessor, compared to $45.29 pm 7.71%$ during the dynamic arm condition. The reliability and accuracy of motor intention detection strategies in wearable device is paramount for both the efficacy and acceptability of this technology. In this article, we offer a detailed analysis of the two most widely used control approaches, trying to highlight their intrinsic structural differences and to discuss their different and complementary performance.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11382/544771
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 4
social impact